Android Nougat Update Promised For Three HTC Devices

Google turned a lot of heads this morning by making a surprise announcement about the name of its next Android platform. The name has officially been confirmed to be Android Nougat. The name is in line with the nomenclature that Google opts, ‘alphabetical in order and sweet to the taste’. This name, however, was the first one that was chosen by Android fans themselves.

At the I/O Conference earlier this year, Google asked its Android users for name suggestions that would be in line with the naming scheme of the company and the internet responded sensibly.

After Google’s announcement, the tech giant HTC wasted no time at all and took to social media to applaud the company’s name while also promising an update to their premium devices. The statement came in under an hour from the company’s international account. The devices eligible for the update include HTC 10, the company’s current flagship, HTC One M9, which was last year’s flagship and HTC One A9, the sleek and chic phone by the company.

It must be noted that HTC issued a similar promise earlier this year, back before Android N received an official name. The recent statement just doubles up the commitment.

However, most users noticed that there was something amiss from the tweet and that was the presence of any sort of release date; in fact, HTC added a teeny tiny disclaimer which stated that HTC will evaluate the time required once Google releases the Nougat AOSP code to the manufacturers. The text further states that a few additional devices might also be announced after the release. One of the notably ignored device from the list was HTC One M8, even though the device is over two years old and HTC doesn’t have any obligation to update the device. However, inclusion of the 2014 flagship device would have been the cause of joy for the company’s many loyal fans.

We expect similar promises from other major stakeholders of the smartphone industry as the release date of Android Nougat draws near. However, users must be patient enough to withstand the depressing delays in software rollouts once the code gets released.